Simple Smile Quotes And Sayings To Make You Feel Better

I want you to smile right now because you are still alive and you are reading this wonderful page of smile quotations.

Smile is a powerful act. It can change your mood, your feelings, and also your actions. This basic simple human expression are cross-cultural. And all smiles have the same meaning even in different societies.

In other words, smiling is a universal ways of communication between mankind.

Do you know that children smile more than 300 times a day? Now you know the reason we smile and laugh more easily and frequently with children around us.

We know that smiling is contagious. When you see someone (even strangers) smile, you will automatically return one as well. It is kind of a subconscious innate reaction.

According to researchers, smiling can make you healthier. It said to have therapeutic effects. Smiles can help to reduce stress hormone levels and increase health and mood enhancing hormone levels. As a result smiling can lowered one’s blood pressure.

Quotes About Smiles And Life

Anyway, I hope these selection of quotations about smiles and life will keep you beaming through the day.


You don’t need a reason or anyone’s permission to smile.” – by Quotationize


“Wear a smile and have friends; wear a scowl and have wrinkles.” – George Eliot


“The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection.” – Thomas Paine


“Colors are the smiles of nature.” – Leigh Hunt


“Sometimes your joy is the source of your smile, but sometimes your smile can be the source of your joy.” – Thích Nhat Hanh


“If you smile when you are alone, then you really mean it.” – Andy Rooney


“A smile is happiness you’ll find right under your nose.” – Tom Wilson


You want to unlock your spirit, break into a smileYou want to unlock your spirit, break into a smile.” – by Quotationize


“All the statistics in the world can’t measure the warmth of a smile.” – Chris Hart


“Peace begins with a smile.” – Mother Teresa


“A smile is an inexpensive way to change your looks.” – Charles Gordy


“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.” – Dr. Seuss


“Laughter is day, and sobriety is night; a smile is the twilight that hovers gently between both, more bewitching than either.” – Henry Ward Beecher


“A smile requires little effort, yet it can lift up your life.” – by Quotationize


“A laugh is a smile that bursts.” – Mary H. Waldrip


“You’re never fully dressed without a smile.” – Martin Charnin


“Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing.” – Mother Teresa


“Give someone a smile today. It could be the only joy he feels today.” – by Quotationize


“They say clothes make a man. But wearing a bright smile can make someone’s day.” – by Quotationize


“A smile is a curve that sets everything straight.” – Phyllis Diller


“The world always looks brighter from behind a smile.” – Unknown


“Start every day with a smile and get it over with.” – W.C. Fields


“A smile is an inexpensive way to change your looks.” – Charles Gordy


“Wrinkles should merely indicate where smiles have been.” – Mark Twain

“Smiles speak beyond all languages.” – by Quotationize


“You’ll find that life is still worthwhile, if you just smile.” – Charles Chaplin


“Like a simple word of “thanks” or a gentle reassuring pat, a smile can turn a life around.” – by Quotationize

“A smile is the best way to get away with trouble even if it’s a fake one.” – Masashi Kishimoto


“A smile is an simple and forgetful act, yet to someone that needed it, it can may last a lifetime.” – by Quotationize


“The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection.” – Thomas Paine


“Be thou the rainbow in the storms of life. The evening beam that smiles the clouds away, and tints tomorrow with prophetic ray.” – Lord Byron


“A glowing smile on a face, can only comes from the warmth of the person’s heart.” – by Quotationize


“If we are not able to smile, then the world will not have peace.” – Thich Nhat Hanh (Being Peace)


“A smile will gain you ten more years of life.” – Chinese Proverb


“A good smile is the sunshine of wisdom.” – Hosea Ballou (Treasury of Thought)


“Sometimes when you smile, it’s not because you’re happy. It’s because you’re strong.” – Pamela Anderson (speech at official launch of the Pamela Anderson Foundation, May 16, 2014)


“Beauty is power; a smile is its sword.” – Charles Reade


Related Topic:

Here is an essay titled “Smiling” written by John Daniel Barry

A professor in one of the Eastern colleges once told me of a nervous breakdown that he had experienced some time before.

“How did you get over it?” I asked.

He smiled rather sheepishly, as if half ashamed to tell. “I went to several of the nerve specialists,” he said, “and I didn’t succeed in getting any help. Then by chance I heard of a woman, not a physician, who had studied nervous diseases for years and had been very successful in treating them. Some friends persuaded me to go and see her. She pulled me through by teaching me how to take care of my thoughts and feelings.”

“How did she do it?”

Again that shame-faced look appeared on the professor’s face. “She began by making me learn to smile,” he said. “You see, I had got down to such depths that I couldn’t smile. It seemed as if I had lost all power over the muscles of my face. They had become set. They not only expressed the depression that I felt, but they actually added to it.”

“Well,” I said, “after losing the power to smile, how did you acquire it again?”

“I simply obeyed instructions. I went home and for half an hour I stood before the mirror and I practiced smiling. At first I had a hard time twisting my mouth into a smile. In spite of myself, the muscles would sag. Then I saw that the muscles were actually fighting against me. I kept on trying and at the end of half an hour I succeeded in making a pretty good imitation of a smile. That exercise I continued for several days till I had overcome the rigidity of those facial muscles and learned to control them. After a time I found I could smile almost at will. When I began to be depressed I would smile. At the same time I would resist the depressing thoughts. The combination of the resisting and the smiling would save me from falling into depression.”

That hard-headed and wholesome philosopher, William James, has expressed the same principle: “When you feel depressed, smile.” It sounds easy. But in most cases it requires strong will, developed by practice. For there are comparatively few of us gifted with natures so sunny that we are continually tempted to smile.

I know a man who married a girl that used to be considered very disagreeable. It was predicted by those who knew the girl well that he would regret his marriage. But they didn’t appreciate the man. They didn’t appreciate his capacity for smiling.

I have myself witnessed little incidents where that capacity worked marvelously on that wife. I have seen her, in the presence of her husband, speak and act in a way that would make many husbands furious. But this husband would smile good-humoredly and the wife’s ill feeling would evaporate. It would be as if the ill feeling had never been.

Those two people have now been married for a good many years. Long ago I noticed that the wife had ceased to be disagreeable in the presence of her husband. From his habit of smiling her ill feeling had become discouraged. It changed to good feeling.

If that husband’s smile had not been sincere, if it had concealed or subtly conveyed ill feeling, it would, of course, have worked very differently. It would have irritated that wife almost beyond endurance. It would have developed the ill feeling in her and made her, perhaps, unendurable.

For smiling, to do good, either to those who smile or to those who look on, must convey kindly feeling. There are those whose smiles are almost terrifying. They can express many kinds of ill feeling, including dislike, resentment, suspicion, cruelty. Then there are smiles that are puzzling, that sometimes create uneasiness. These smiles are often called “enigmatical.” The smile on the face of the Mona Lisa is of this kind. It makes some people uncomfortable. And we all know the truth of Shakespeare’s saying that a man may smile and smile and be a villain still. And yet we all believe that this kind of smiling is sure to betray itself. In it there can’t be anything wholesome, anything that would help to uplift the spirit.

We human beings are very proud of being the only animals that can smile. And yet we don’t show a very proper appreciation of our gift. Though we may realize its magical qualities, we often fail at the critical moment to use them. For example, we may know that when we have to choose between smiling and frowning the consequences will greatly affect our own peace of mind. If we frown we shall be further involved in trouble. If we smile we may obviate the trouble.

And yet, as a rule, under such circumstances, most of us choose to frown. We ought to imitate that nervous professor and learn smiling as an art. Habit will make it second nature.


Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
“Smiling” is reprinted from “Intimations:Dealing Mainly With Aspects of Everyday Living” by John D. Barry. Published: San Francisco, P. Elder and company [c1913]